Incontinence in Children

Incontinence in children is common. There are many different treatment options for incontinence in children. Incontinence in children tends to occur less often after age 5: About 10 percent of 5-year-olds, 5 percent of 10-year-olds, and 1 percent of 18-year-olds experience episodes of incontinence.

Incontinence in Children: An Introduction

Parents or guardians of children who experience bedwetting at night, or "accidents" during the day, should treat this problem with understanding and patience. This loss of urinary control is called urinary incontinence, or just incontinence.
 
Although incontinence affects many young people, it usually disappears naturally over time, which suggests that incontinence, for some people, may be a normal part of growing up.
 
Incontinence at the normal age of toilet training may cause great distress. Daytime or nighttime incontinence can be embarrassing. It is important to understand that many children experience occasional incontinence, and that treatment is available for most children who have difficulty controlling their bladders.
 
Incontinence happens less often after age 5: About 10 percent of 5-year-olds, 5 percent of 10-year-olds, and 1 percent of 18-year-olds experience episodes of incontinence. It is twice as common in boys as in girls.
 

Incontinence in Children Versus Enuresis

Incontinence is also called enuresis.
 
  • Primary enuresis is wetting in a person who has never been dry for at least 6 months.
     
  • Secondary enuresis is wetting that begins after at least 6 months of dryness.
     
  • Nocturnal enuresis is wetting that usually occurs during sleep (nighttime incontinence).
     
  • Diurnal enuresis is wetting when awake (daytime incontinence).
     
Traveling With Kids
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