Incontinence Channel
Topics
Medications
Quicklinks
Related Channels

Incontinence Articles A-Z

Menopause and Bladder Problems - Pregnancy and Bladder Problems

This page contains links to eMedTV Incontinence Articles containing information on subjects from Menopause and Bladder Problems to Pregnancy and Bladder Problems. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Menopause and Bladder Problems
    Your body stops making the female hormone, estrogen, after menopause, and bladder problems can occur. This eMedTV article discusses menopause and bladder problems and links to other articles about urinary incontinence.
  • Merbetriq
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Myrbetriq to treat an overactive bladder in adults. This eMedTV resource discusses some dosing instructions, lists potential side effects, and links to more details. Merbetriq is a common misspelling of Myrbetriq.
  • Myrbetriq
    Myrbetriq tablets are taken once daily to help control the symptoms of an overactive bladder. This eMedTV selection explores this prescription drug in more detail, with information on how it works, potential side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Myrbetriq and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at why it is generally recommended that women not take Myrbetriq (mirabegron) while breastfeeding. This resource discusses the research that has been done and explains whether the drug passes through breast milk.
  • Myrbetriq and Pregnancy
    The FDA has classified Myrbetriq (mirabegron) as a pregnancy Category C drug. This eMedTV resource looks at the reasons why this drug may not be safe for pregnant women. It also covers the potential problems that occurred during animal studies.
  • Myrbetriq Dosage
    As this page of the eMedTV Web library explains, taking Myrbetriq extended-release tablets once daily can help treat an overactive bladder. This article outlines specific Myrbetriq dosing guidelines and suggestions for how to take the drug properly.
  • Myrbetriq Drug Interactions
    Using warfarin, tramadol, or other drugs while taking Myrbetriq may lead to interactions. This eMedTV article examines the problems that may occur when Myrbetriq is combined with these and many other medications, and how to reduce your risk for problems.
  • Myrbetriq Medication Information
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Myrbetriq to treat the symptoms of an overactive bladder in adults. This eMedTV Web page contains more information on this medication, including why it may not be safe for some people and potential side effects.
  • Myrbetriq Overdose
    As this eMedTV segment explains, overdosing on Myrbetriq (mirabegron) may cause problems like high blood pressure or heart palpitations. Other potential overdose symptoms and treatment options are described in this Web page.
  • Myrbetriq Side Effects
    People who took Myrbetriq in clinical trials reported problems like common cold symptoms and headaches. This eMedTV Web page takes a closer look at some of the other possible Myrbetriq side effects, including some complications that require treatment.
  • Myrbetriq Uses
    As this eMedTV segment explains, adults who use Myrbetriq to treat an overactive bladder may find they have fewer leaking accidents and urinate less often. This page examines this prescription medication, including details on how it works.
  • Myrbetriq Warnings and Precautions
    Myrbetriq may increase blood pressure in some people. Other warnings associated with Myrbetriq are listed in this eMedTV article, including safety precautions for people taking certain medications or those who have certain medical conditions.
  • Overactive Bladder
    Overactive bladder is also known as urge incontinence. This eMedTV article discusses the condition in detail, explaining its causes, symptoms, and treatment. This page also links to other articles about urinary incontinence.
  • Overactive Bladder Treatment
    As explained in this article from the eMedTV Web site, overactive bladder treatment may involve behavioral therapy, medications, or surgery, among other things. This article discusses the different treatment options in detail.
  • Oxytrol
    Available in the form of a patch, Oxytrol is a prescription drug that is used to treat overactive bladder. This eMedTV segment provides a detailed description of how the drug works and also discusses its possible side effects and dosing guidelines.
  • Oxytrol and Breastfeeding
    It is generally recommended to avoid breastfeeding while using Oxytrol. This article from the eMedTV archives provides more information on Oxytrol and breastfeeding, including information on whether the drug passes through breast milk.
  • Oxytrol and Constipation
    Oxytrol may potentially cause constipation. This segment from the eMedTV Web site covers Oxytrol and constipation in more detail, discusses how common this side effect appears to be, and explains what you can do if constipation occurs.
  • Oxytrol and Dry Mouth
    Dry mouth is one of the most common side effects of Oxytrol. This portion of the eMedTV library explores the link between Oxytrol and dry mouth in more detail and provides a list of suggestions to help with a dry mouth.
  • Oxytrol and Pregnancy
    Oxytrol is most likely safe for use in pregnant women, but the full risks are not yet known. This eMedTV article contains more detailed information about Oxytrol and pregnancy, and explains what happened when the drug was given to pregnant animals.
  • Oxytrol Dosage
    There is only one standard Oxytrol dosage -- one patch applied every three to four days. This page from the eMedTV Web site offers other Oxytrol dosing information and includes a list of suggestions for how, when, and where to apply the patch.
  • Oxytrol Drug Interactions
    Anticholinergics, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, and pramlintide may cause Oxytrol drug interactions. This eMedTV segment lists specific types of anticholinergic drugs and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors that may interact negatively with Oxytrol.
  • Oxytrol For Women
    Oxytrol For Women is a nonprescription medicine used to treat an overactive bladder in women. This eMedTV Web article offers an in-depth look at the medicine, including information on how it works, possible side effects, dosing information, and more.
  • Oxytrol For Women Dosage
    Oxytrol For Women patches are applied every four days to treat an overactive bladder. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at specific Oxytrol For Women dosing guidelines and also offers tips on how to effectively and safely use this medicine.
  • Oxytrol For Women Drug Interactions
    Several products can cause Oxytrol For Women drug interactions, including Benadryl and Tylenol PM. This eMedTV page outlines other medications that can cause negative reactions with Oxytrol For Women and describes the problems that may occur.
  • Oxytrol For Women Patch Information
    Oxytrol For Women is a nonprescription medicine used to treat an overactive bladder in adult women. This eMedTV Web page features more information on Oxytrol For Women, including side effects of the patch, safety issues to be aware of, and more.
  • Oxytrol For Women Side Effects
    Dry mouth, constipation, and diarrhea are some of the potential Oxytrol For Women side effects. This eMedTV Web page takes an in-depth look at other possible problems, including potentially serious reactions that may require immediate medical care.
  • Oxytrol For Women Uses
    If you are an adult woman with an overactive bladder, you may benefit from Oxytrol For Women. This eMedTV Web page takes a closer look at uses for Oxytrol For Women, including how this nonprescription medication works and who it is designed for.
  • Oxytrol For Women Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to use Oxytrol For Women if you have glaucoma or certain other medical conditions. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at other important warnings and precautions with Oxytrol For Women to be aware of before starting treatment.
  • Oxytrol No Prescription
    Available without a prescription, Oxytrol For Women is used to treat an overactive bladder in women. This eMedTV resource takes a brief look at dosing tips, potential side effects, and general safety concerns. It also links to more details.
  • Oxytrol Overdose
    Dry eyes, severe constipation, and difficulty urinating are possible signs of an Oxytrol overdose. This eMedTV page describes overdose treatment options that are available and lists other symptoms that may occur as a result of taking too much Oxytrol.
  • Oxytrol Patch for Overactive Bladder
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the Oxytrol patch is the only overactive bladder medication sold in the form of a patch. This article gives an introduction to using this product and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Oxytrol Side Effects
    Vision changes, diarrhea, and dry mouth are some of the most common Oxytrol side effects seen in studies. This eMedTV page describes other common side effects of Oxytrol and also lists potentially serious side effects that require medical attention.
  • Oxytrol Uses
    Oxytrol is used for treating urinary incontinence, urinary urgency, and other overactive bladder symptoms. This eMedTV resource further explains what the medicine is used for and discusses Oxytrol uses in children.
  • Oxytrol Warnings and Precautions
    Oxytrol could potentially make glaucoma worse. This segment from the eMedTV site lists other Oxytrol warnings and precautions that you should be aware of before starting treatment and includes information on who should not use the Oxytrol patch.
  • Pregnancy and Bladder Problems
    Some people lose bladder control after pregnancy, and bladder problems typically go away by themselves. This eMedTV article discusses pregnancy and bladder problems and links to other articles about urinary incontinence.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.