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Diagnosing Male Incontinence - Enablex Warnings and Precautions

This page contains links to eMedTV Incontinence Articles containing information on subjects from Diagnosing Male Incontinence to Enablex Warnings and Precautions. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Diagnosing Male Incontinence
    To make an incontinence diagnosis, the healthcare provider will ask a number of questions and perform a physical exam. This eMedTV article discusses male incontinence in detail and links to other articles about urinary incontinence.
  • Diagnosing Overactive Bladder
    When diagnosing overactive bladder, your doctor will ask about your symptoms, perform a physical exam, and possibly do some tests. This eMedTV discusses how overactive bladder is diagnosed and links to other articles about urinary incontinence.
  • Ditropan
    Ditropan is a drug approved to treat the symptoms of neurogenic bladder. This eMedTV Web page offers a complete overview of Ditropan, including information on its uses, possible side effects, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Ditropan and Breastfeeding
    It's currently unclear if it is safe for breastfeeding women to take Ditropan. This eMedTV segment discusses Ditropan and breastfeeding in more detail and describes the problems that may occur if the drug does pass through breast milk.
  • Ditropan and Constipation
    Constipation is a side effect that may potentially occur with the use of Ditropan. This section of the eMedTV library includes more information on Ditropan and constipation, and explains what you can do if constipation occurs.
  • Ditropan and Dry Mouth
    Dry mouth appears to be the most common side effect of Ditropan. This portion of the eMedTV Web site contains more information on Ditropan and dry mouth, and includes a list of suggestions that can help provide relief.
  • Ditropan and Pregnancy
    Ditropan is probably safe for use during pregnancy, but the full risks are not known at this time. This eMedTV article offers more information on Ditropan and pregnancy, and describes the clinical studies that were conducted on animals.
  • Ditropan Dosage
    The recommended Ditropan dosage for adults is 5 mg two to three times daily. This part of the eMedTV library also provides Ditropan dosing recommendations for children and elderly people, and offers information on when and how to take the drug.
  • Ditropan Drug Information
    This eMedTV segment explains why healthcare providers prescribe Ditropan to treat frequent urination and other symptoms of neurogenic bladder. This article gives an overview of Ditropan, with information on how to take it, drug warnings, and more.
  • Ditropan Drug Interactions
    Drugs that may interact with Ditropan include anticholinergic drugs, pramlintide, and protease inhibitors. This eMedTV segment explains what other medicines may cause Ditropan drug interactions and describes the effects of these interactions.
  • Ditropan Overdose
    Shakiness, fever, and vomiting are symptoms that may occur as a result of a Ditropan overdose. This eMedTV Web page lists other signs of an overdose, lists factors that can affect symptoms, and describes the treatment options that are available.
  • Ditropan Side Effects
    Nausea, dizziness, and constipation are common side effects of Ditropan. Besides common side effects, this eMedTV page also lists serious Ditropan side effects that require medical attention, such as confusion, hallucinations, or allergic reactions.
  • Ditropan Uses
    Ditropan is used for treating bladder problems caused by nerve disorders. This page from the eMedTV archives explores Ditropan uses in more detail and explains whether the medication is used in children or off-label for other conditions.
  • Ditropan Warnings and Precautions
    Before using Ditropan, tell your doctor if you have GERD, glaucoma, or allergies. This eMedTV page lists other conditions to tell your doctor about before using Ditropan. Warnings and precautions on who should avoid the drug are also included.
  • Ditropan XL
    Used to treat overactive bladder symptoms, Ditropan XL is a long-acting medication that is taken once a day. This eMedTV article provides a complete overview of this drug, including how it works and what you can expect during treatment.
  • Ditropan XL and Breastfeeding
    At this time, it is not known whether Ditropan XL is safe for breastfeeding women. As this eMedTV article explains, no studies have been conducted on Ditropan XL and breastfeeding, so it is not known whether the drug passes through breast milk.
  • Ditropan XL and Constipation
    In clinical studies, up to 13 percent of people taking Ditropan XL reported having constipation. This eMedTV Web page offers more information on Ditropan XL and constipation, and provides suggestions for constipation relief.
  • Ditropan XL and Dry Mouth
    Dry mouth appears to be the most commonly reported Ditropan XL side effect. This article from the eMedTV archives discusses Ditropan XL and dry mouth in more detail and includes a list of suggestions for dry mouth relief.
  • Ditropan XL and Pregnancy
    Ditropan XL is a pregnancy Category B medication, but the full risks are not known. This page from the eMedTV site contains more information on Ditropan XL and pregnancy, and explains whether problems occurred when the drug was given to animals.
  • Ditropan XL Dosage
    The usual starting Ditropan XL dosage for adults is 5 to 10 mg once a day. As this eMedTV segment explains, dosing can be increased to 30 mg daily if symptoms do not improve. Ditropan XL dosing guidelines for children are also included on this page.
  • Ditropan XL Drug Information
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, Ditropan XL is a long-acting medication used to treat symptoms of an overactive bladder. This article has more information on this product, including what to discuss with your doctor before taking this drug.
  • Ditropan XL Drug Interactions
    Medicines such as protease inhibitors or pramlintide may potentially cause Ditropan XL drug interactions. This eMedTV article explains what other medicines may lead to Ditropan XL interactions and describes the possible effects of mixing these drugs.
  • Ditropan XL Overdose
    If you take too much Ditropan XL, overdose symptoms may include dry skin, dry eyes, and dilated pupils. This eMedTV article lists other possible signs of a Ditropan XL overdose and describes the various treatment options that are available.
  • Ditropan XL Side Effects
    Diarrhea, nausea, and dry mouth are some of the most commonly reported Ditropan XL side effects. As this eMedTV page explains, there are also a number of rare but potentially serious side effects that may occur, such as arrhythmia and confusion.
  • Ditropan XL Tablets -- Information
    This part of the eMedTV site contains information on Ditropan XL tablets, which are used to treat symptoms of an overactive bladder. This article tells you what you need to know about dosing, safety guidelines, and more.
  • Ditropan XL Uses
    Ditropan XL is used for treating an overactive bladder and bladder problems due to neurological problems. This eMedTV resource discusses Ditropan XL uses in more detail and explains whether the drug is approved for use in children.
  • Ditropan XL Warnings and Precautions
    You should not take Ditropan XL if you have delayed gastric emptying. This eMedTV segment explains who else should not take the drug. Other Ditropan XL warnings and precautions, including possible side effects, are also included in this article.
  • Enablax
    Enablex is a prescription drug that is licensed for treating symptoms of an overactive bladder. This eMedTV Web page describes how Enablex works and explains the effects of the medication. Enablax is a common misspelling of Enablex.
  • Enablex
    Enablex is a prescription drug that is licensed for the treatment of overactive bladder. This part of the eMedTV Web site offers an in-depth look at Enablex, including information on its uses, dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and more.
  • Enablex -- Medication Information
    This eMedTV article talks about Enablex, a prescription drug used to treat symptoms of an overactive bladder. This resource provides information on how the medication works, how to take it, and what to discuss with your doctor before taking Enablex.
  • Enablex and Breastfeeding
    It is not known if it is safe to use Enablex while breastfeeding. This article on the eMedTV Web site contains more information on Enablex and breastfeeding, and explains whether the medication passes through breast milk.
  • Enablex and Constipation
    Constipation is a potential side effect of Enablex. This segment from the eMedTV archives provides more information on Enablex and constipation, and explains how common this side effect is with the medication.
  • Enablex and Dry Mouth
    Dry mouth appears to be the most common side effect of Enablex. This page of the eMedTV Web site offers more information on Enablex and dry mouth, including a list of tips for relief and an explanation of how common this side effect is.
  • Enablex and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe for pregnant women to take Enablex. This page from the eMedTV Web site contains more information on Enablex and pregnancy, and describes the complications that occurred when the drug was given to animals in clinical studies.
  • Enablex Dosage
    The maximum recommended Enablex dosage for overactive bladder treatment is 15 mg once a day. As this eMedTV Web page explains, dosing usually starts at 7.5 mg daily, but it can be increased to 15 mg if symptoms do not improve after two weeks.
  • Enablex Drug Interactions
    Thioridazine, nefazodone, and protease inhibitors may potentially interact with Enablex. This eMedTV segment lists other medicines that may cause Enablex drug interactions and describes the possible effects of these negative interactions.
  • Enablex Overdose
    Dry mouth or eyes, blurred vision, and dilated pupils are possible symptoms of an Enablex overdose. This eMedTV article describes other symptoms that may occur if you take too much of the drug, as are possible treatment options.
  • Enablex Side Effects
    Some of the most common Enablex side effects include stomach pain, nausea, and dry mouth. This eMedTV page offers a more complete list of possible side effects of the drug, including serious ones that should be reported to a doctor right away.
  • Enablex Uses
    Enablex is used for the treatment of overactive bladder symptoms, such as urinary incontinence. This eMedTV resource provides a more in-depth look at Enablex uses and describes how the medication works to relax the bladder muscles.
  • Enablex Warnings and Precautions
    Enablex can cause dizziness and drowsiness. This eMedTV page lists other possible side effects of Enablex. Warnings and precautions on who should not take the drug (such as those with urinary retention or uncontrolled glaucoma) are also included.
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